Cannabis legalization

I don’t understand this English question and need help to study.

 

Hello.

I need a brainstorm and ouline for my English class, I already write summery.

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Now I am on step 2 and I need you to do this one!!!!!!!!!

Brainstorm and Outline

A. “Free write” about your ideas on your topic.

B. Now, look at your notes from the source. What specific parts of the text do you want to respond

to?

C. Create an outline to plan how you will arrange your argument.

D. The outline should include the topic, the position, the main ideas – reasons for the position, and

support for those ideas.

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Plz do not use hard vocabulary because when I ordered the summary they used difficult Vocablary and the instrocutor know that > seriously

plz make some misteks and if you can delete some sentences from the summry it would be better

Step 1

-How and why have attitudes about cannabis legalization changed so much?

People have become more open-minded about the legalization of cannabis since the late 1990s, as some states have legalized it for recreational use. This article will focus on the reasons behind this change in attitude. Some of the major or root causes include the high degree of media framing, a significant decrease in religious affiliation, and a reduction in punitive laws. However, the change in attitude had no connection to with race, ethnicity, education, gender, and political affiliation. Also, the legalization of cannabis in one state was determined to have no effect on the change in attitude in the neighboring states (Felson, Adamczyk, & Thomas, 2019).

-Law enforcement practices in the first two states in the U.S. to legalize recreational marijuana

 

This article emphasizes on the need for researching practices of law enforcement in areas where the sale of recreational marijuana is considered legal, due to the rapid expansion of the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes; with the main focus being on Washington and Colorado, the two states that first legalized marijuana for recreational purposes. The authors used a random sample of 25 law enforcement agencies in each state in their survey and came up with results that suggested a high number of underage use even though the states carried out underage compliance checks in every licensed store thrice a year, and the common nature of marijuana-impaired driving. They concluded that there is a need for law enforcement regarding the sales and provision of marijuana to be enhanced to prevent excessive underage access and use (Wiens, Lenk, Fabian, & Erickson, 2018).

– Thou shalt not: Religiosity and attitudes toward marijuana legalization

This article focuses on a study that expands on a research that was done earlier with the main focus being on the religious attitudes towards the legalization of marijuana. The author used the social control theory framework to examine how the attitudes of marijuana legalization varied by the levels or degree of religious affiliation. He conducted a General Social Survey using three years, 2006, 2008 and 2010. The results revealed that the higher the religious affiliation, the less likely an individual is to support the legalization of marijuana. The findings were also a bit contradictory of the findings of the previous research which claimed that religious salience strongly influenced attitudes towards the legalization of marijuana (Krystosek, 2016).

-The emerging public discourse on state legalization of marijuana for recreational use in the US: Analysis of news media coverage, 2010–2014

The main focus here is on the need for scientific evidence regarding the consequences that the legalization of marijuana will have on public health. The analysis was done on a 20% random sample of articles and stories in the news regarding the topic from every available source dating between 2010 and 2014. The results revealed that the news stories focused mainly on the four states that had legalized marijuana during that period; Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington, and DC. 53% of the articles were pro-legalization, while the remaining 47% were anti-legalization. Pro-legalization opinions maintained that legalization would cut the costs and reduce the involvement of criminal justice by 20% and increase tax revenue by 19%; while anti-legalization arguments maintained that it would result in adverse effects on public health and encourage marijuana-impaired driving (McGinty et al., 2016).

 

 

– The clinical implications of legalizing marijuana: Are physician and non-physician providers prepared?

A survey was conducted on 114 healthcare professionals who provide care to adolescents, children, and pregnant and breastfeeding mothers in Colorado to analyze their knowledge on state marijuana laws and their perceptions on the risks of legalizing marijuana. Results revealed that they had sufficient knowledge about the laws, but were cautious about supporting the legalization of marijuana use because it would resent high risks for certain groups, especially adolescents and pregnant or breastfeeding women. The authors concluded that providers are often uncomfortable talking to their patients about the risks of marijuana use, and therefore additional education on the issue is necessary given the fast rate at which marijuana use is being legalized in the US (Brooks, Gundersen, Flynn, Brooks-Russell, & Bull, 2017).

-Considering marijuana legalization carefully: insights for other jurisdictions from analysis for Vermont.

This article focuses on the analysis that was done by The RAND Corporation during a report on the consequences of legalizing marijuana in Vermont, and how these consequences relate to other jurisdictions. It was determined that the legalization of marijuana in Vermont cut the costs of enforcing prohibitory marijuana laws on adults by $1 per adult per year. Revenues that the state received from taxing the residents every time they purchased the legalized marijuana also increased significantly. (Caulkins & Kilmer, 2016).

Citation

Brooks, E., Gundersen, D. C., Flynn, E., Brooks-Russell, A., & Bull, S. (2017). The clinical implications of legalizing marijuana: Are physician and non-physician providers prepared? Addictive Behaviors, 72, 1-7. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.03.007

Caulkins, J. P., & Kilmer, B. (2016). Considering marijuana legalization carefully: insights for other jurisdictions from analysis for Vermont. Addiction, 111(12), 2082-2089. doi:10.1111/add.13289

Felson, J., Adamczyk, A., & Thomas, C. (2019). How and why have attitudes about cannabis legalization changed so much? Social Science Research, 78, 12-27. doi:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2018.12.011

Krystosek, D. J. (2016). Thou shalt not: Religiosity and attitudes toward marijuana legalization. International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, 47, 58-70. doi:10.1016/j.ijlcj.2016.08.001

McGinty, E. E., Samples, H., Bandara, S. N., Saloner, B., Bachhuber, M. A., & Barry, C. L. (2016). The emerging public discourse on state legalization of marijuana for recreational use in the US: Analysis of news media coverage, 2010–2014. Preventive Medicine, 90, 114-120. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.040

Wiens, T., Lenk, K. M., Fabian, L. E., & Erickson, D. J. (2018). Law enforcement practices in the first two states in U.S. to legalize recreational marijuana. International Journal of Drug Policy, 61, 38-43. doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2018.08.018.

 

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